215 Heyward Street

Brooklyn, NY 11206

718-302-7900

The main entrance of the school is located at 266 Rutledge Street. 

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The Campos Spotlight

 

January 2017

  Norma  

Campos Senior,

Class of 2017

What is one challenge you faced in middle or high school and how did you work through it?

One challenge I faced in middle/high school was trying to figure out who Norma Reyes was, who she actually is. Apart from being a daughter, a grandchild, an older and younger sister, a student, a friend, who is Norma Reyes as a person? Who am I for myself? I managed to figure out some of it by expanding my abilities and expanding my mind to other things and other people. I got involved in Theatre and through that I found a part of myself I didn't know that held a great love for the art. I expanded this passion and was accepted into two amazing Theatre programs which have shaped me a lot as well. Now in my senior year, I am familiar with who Norma Reyes is, but I also know I will change over time with my future experiences.  

What impact do you feel you have made so far as a Campos Cougar?

As a Campos Cougar I feel I have stood proud and been supportive to my school. Apart from being in every school play, I also manage the statistics book for the girls basketball team. I have also represented the school by being on the school's softball team my sophomore year. I have expanded my knowledge of Theatre through programs I have attended. I have an internship with Grand St. Settlement which is yet another way to represent our school. I love to believe that the more I dedicate myself and give to my school, the better representative I will be. I believe the students play a big role in making our school what we want it to be and more.

What life skill do you believe you learned while at Campos?

One life goal I've learned while attending Juan Morel Campos is patience. It may sound simple and basic, however, I have always been a control freak, a person who is impatient when it comes to doing and saying things. I love control and I love everything done and said on time and when needed, not before or later. Along with Theatre and other programs I have gotten involved in, I have learned to value time. I have learned to cherish and use every moment wisely; not everything has to be impulsive. When I can just have a bit of patience and less control of things, I can analyze and make sure of my actions and statements. When I can be more empathetic, more open minded to others, I have more humanity.

 

Ariel

Campos Parent

 

Tiana, 7th Grade

 

Timothy,11th Grade

What is one challenge you faced in middle or high school and how did you work through it?

One challenge that I faced in high school was learning how to understand the importance of the moment and being able to separate myself from distractions going on around me, whether it was in class or in my neighborhood.  It was an ongoing challenge as a young person trying to navigate between paying attention in class and getting caught up in situations that could get me into trouble. As time went on maturity was the key for me in dealing with these issues. I learned that I was accountable for my actions, not my teachers or my parents.

What is one challenge you face as a parent and how are you managing it?

A challenge that we continuously face as parents is keeping our children focused and helping them understand that everything that we as parents/teachers are doing is to help our children progress to the next phase of their journey as young adults.  We try to manage it by talking and letting them know that just because some people seem like they have "it" figured out doesn't necessarily mean that they do. Even as adults we're always trying to better ourselves; we're not perfect after all.

What project could you work on to make Campos a better school and community?

If there were a mentoring program or some type of volunteering, whether it is to help clean up our parks or spend time with our elders, I would like to get involved. I think that these types of activities help build good relationships and a sense of community.

 

What is one challenge you faced in middle or high school and how did you work through it?

I attended a predominantly West Indian school in the Bronx and two things were very prevalent, a dislike of Latinos and a hate for gays and lesbians. As a Puerto Rican LGBT student who also hung out with other Latino and LGBT youth, we were often the target for discrimination and physical assaults. We usually dealt with it by fighting back but that never stopped them from coming back to bother us. It was after one particular attack that my friends and I organized ourselves and took our concerns to the principal and reported the incident to the police. Needless to say, those kids never came after us again.

What impact do you feel you have made so far as a Grand Street staff?

I feel that one of the impacts that I've been able to make at JMC has been helping to start the Gay Straight Alliance (GSA) along with my co-worker Gaylen and some great student leaders. The GSA plays an important role because it offers a safe and open environment for not just LGBT students, but any student who wishes to join. The GSA started small and grew quickly. We have done many workshops and even gone on trips together to places like The LGBT Center and an LGBT Youth Summit. Right now the GSA is working on building the leadership of it's members and transitioning into a more youth-led club.

What life skill do you wish your students will learn while at Campos?

I think it is essential for every student to learn how to advocate for him or her self, take care of responsibilities, and be self-sufficient. I learned this as a youth by paying attention to the adults around me and distinguishing between who took care of their responsibilities and who did not. I wanted to emulate the adults who were responsible and seemed like they were moving forward, so I nurtured relationships with them and some of them became my mentors. Even today, they continue to play a big role in my life.

Ra 

Case Manager,

Grand Street Settlement